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Chateau of Chambord, France

  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord
  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

  • Chateau of Chambord

    Chateau of Chambord

The palace of Chambord is situated a few kilometres from Blois in Sologne, 177 kilometres south of Paris. An example of the early French Renaissance, the palace of Francis 1 is an essential stop on the circuit of the castles of the Loire valley.
If the influence of Leonardo da Vinci, friend of the king and official ‘’architect’’ (who died a few months before construction began), hangs over the spectacular staircase of double symmetrical flights, the author of this strange residence –both astonishing and uninhabitable – is still not known. The plan of the building is that of a fortress on flat country. It includes a vast rectangular enclosing wall, with round towers at the corners and a much larger tower rising from one side. This is of truly colossal proportions and by itself makes up almost all of the castle. Inside, though, a surprising arrangement of standardized apartments belies a skilful knowledge of avant-garde architecture.

Public Establishment of the National Estate of Chambord
Domaine national de Chambord
41250 Chambord France

Email:
Website: www.chambord.org

The National Estate of Chambord has been state-owned since 1930 and became an industrial and commercial public establishment in 2005. Under the patronage of the French President, it is under the authority of the following Ministries: Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea; Agriculture, Fisheries and Food; Culture and Communication.

« I know how to divert rivers, to make water flow where it has never passed before, build underground noiselessly, lay siege to any fortress. I fear comparison with no one whether in painting, mathematics, anatomy, sculpture or hydraulics…”

That’s how I present myself, with great modesty…

Continue reading Who am I ?

Francis I, Towards Royal Absolutism Patron of the Arts and Letters, Francis I is the perfect image of a Renaissance prince. At just twenty years old he succeeded his distant cousin Louis XII to the throne. According to a prophecy made by the hermit Francesco da Paola to his mother Louisa of Savoy, fate had destined him to the role of sovereign. And so, on 1 January 1515, in the most lawful way, the young Francis I, consecrated king of the French, became one of God’s elect.

He won much glory in arms in September 1515 with the famous victory of Marignano against the Swiss who defended their Milanese dominions. This brilliant success was the result of powerful artillery, the presence of the knight Bayard and of Francis I’s actions at the centre of the battlefield. It was a personal victory for the king that impressed the whole of Europe and initiated his glorious reign. Furthermore, he benefited from the expedition to Italy to sign the pact of Bologna with Pope Leo X which allowed the king to nominate bishops and cardinals, in this way strengthening his power over the clergy.

Francis I established the legal collection in the Royal Library with a copy of every printed book and, thanks to the ordinance of Villers-Cotterêts, imposed the use of French rather than Latin for all official acts, thus making French the only language for government.

Finally, in the military sphere, the long rivalry with the emperor Charles V would be a constant obsession in a reign that lasted 32 years; a reign that would affirm itself for its artistic and intellectual patronage, for strengthening French unity and for founding the system of absolute monarchy.

1515 marked the fortunate meeting of a young Renaissance prince with power and the arts. Following in the footsteps of his predecessors, as soon as he was crowned Francis I threw himself into conquering the lands of Italy. Moved at the beginning by the desire to emblazon his new power with a clamorous victory, he discovered, together with his companions in arms, an inexhaustible fount of marvels: old buildings, palaces, villas, scenarios of northern Italy, multi-faceted artists.

Continue reading From Italy to Chambord